KENTUCKY BORN URBAN DESIGNER LANDSCAPES NYC

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brook Klausing has been in the green industry as long as he can remember.
Originally from Lexington KY, he cut his first lawn for a neighbor at age 8. He and his brother incorporated Klausing Lawn & Landscape when they were in middle school and were installing gardens for top Landscape Architects by the time they graduated High school.   After moving to New York in early 2000, he considered it the wild west of gardening.   Inspired to bring nature to the urban setting, he founded Brook Landscape in 2007.   The companies focus, transforming undervalued exterior real estate into refined lush outdoor living spaces.  Brook Landscape has designed hundreds of gardens from celebrity’s penthouses to the Brooklyn Museum.    Currently this May, he is launching Natural Workshop, a collection of outdoor furnishings & garden objects and will participate in the Collective Design Fair.
Brook Klausing of Brook Landscape will create a site-specific green corridor that transports visitors from the fair entrance through a classical garden passageway. The subtle, enchanting installation will feature raw timbers salvaged from the Rockaway boardwalk after Hurricane Sandy. Select pieces from Natural Workshop, a new product company launching this spring from Klausing and collaborator Brian Green, will be integrated into the space. Bringing the outdoors in, the project will impart a transitional space with an air of permanence and playfulness.
“Collective Design is an intimate fair, eschewing the feeding frenzy of most fairs,” says its organizer, Steven Learner. “Most design collectors, unlike art collectors, are guided by their advisers rather than making spontaneous or emotional purchases. In the case of design objects, these advisers are architects and interior designers, our core audience.” He says that growth in New York’s high-end real estate development is boosting its “self-sustaining design ecosystem”. “The rise of a dynamic contemporary art market has fueled thinking that contemporary design, at the moment still wildly undervalued, is the next great asset class,” he adds.
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